Water Control Solutions

BERMAD Waterworks

BERMAD Air Valves Sizing and Positioning using BERMAD Air Software — Your Questions Answered

In a recent BERMAD webinar, “Air Valves Sizing and Positioning using BERMAD Air Software,” Tal Levi, our Waterworks Application Engineer, talked about the challenges of proper air control in water system design.

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Eyal Geller

Eyal Geller
BERMAD's Air Valves Product Manager, responsible for the product line's compliance with the needs and requirments of end users, operators and systems' designers, while sustaining competitive advantage and ensuring growth.

Recent Posts

In a recent BERMAD webinar, “Air Control in Sewage & Wastewater Applications,” Eyal Geller, our Air Valves Product Manager, shared some insights regarding the use of air valves in sewage and wastewater applications.

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Topics: Waterworks, BERMAD webinar

Sewage (wastewater) is produced wherever people live and work and comes from residential, institutional, and commercial sources. Wastewater that comes from industrial processes such as the production or manufacture of goods is classed as industrial wastewater (not as sewage), but may also get sent to sewage systems. All categories of sewage usually carry pathogenic organisms, which can transmit disease to humans and animals and cause damage to the environment. For this reason, in most countries, sewage collection and treatment is subject to strict regulations and standards.

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Topics: Waterworks

Air valves are essential for air control in water systems. They help prevent inefficiency caused by air that is trapped during filling and pressurized operation, as well as to prevent damage in vacuum conditions and pressure surges.

However, air valves are known to leak, especially when located at low pressure points in the water system. This can cause water wastage and interrupt the smooth operation of the water system.

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Topics: Waterworks

Air control is a critical factor in water systems. Every water system contains entrapped air, which may reduce flow cross-section, increase energy costs during pipeline filling and pressurized operation, cause pressure surges, interfere with metering or even stop the flow altogether. In addition, there are cases where air cannot enter the network. This can cause vacuum conditions and may lead to pipes collapsing or other mechanical damage to system components.

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Topics: Waterworks

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